Advanced Language Practice (with key) by Peter Sunderland, Vince Michael

By Peter Sunderland, Vince Michael

This article is designed to revise and consolidate grammar issues on the point of CAE and talent assessments, and this version has been revised to incorporate skillability fabric within the layout of the 2002 examination. it truly is on hand without or with key.

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Additional resources for Advanced Language Practice (with key)

Example text

Reporting verbs • Present reference With verbs such as believe, know, say, think, which report people's opinions, a passive construction is often used to avoid a weak subject, and to give a generalised opinion. With present reference, the passive is followed by the present infinitive. The criminal is thought to be in hiding in the London area. Vitamin C is known to be good for treating colds. • Past reference With past reference, the passive is followed by the past infinitive. Smith is believed to have left England last week.

Will can also be used for emphasis, meaning 'insist on doing'. If you will stay out late, no wonder you are tired! (insist on staying out) • Supposing, otherwise Supposing or suppose can replace if, mainly in everyday speech. Supposing you won the football pools, what would you do? Otherwise means 'or if not'. It can go at the beginning or end of the sentence. If you hadn't given us directions, we wouldn't have found the house. Thanks for your directions to the house. We wouldn't have found it otherwise.

Chris and I (14) ............................... (go) together last year, and we (15) ............................... (think) of spending two or three months in the USA next year. I (16) ............................... (always/want) to visit some of the places where Elvis (17) ............................... (perform). ' Jean says that Elvis (18) ............................... (be) her obsession ever since she (19) ............................... (be) ten years old, and she (20) ...............................

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